Join us for for Maple Month in March

Every year in the White Mountains when the daytime temperatures start to warm up and the nighttime temps are still below zero the sap starts to run in our maple trees. This only lasts for about 4-6 weeks with the sap flow is at its heaviest for about 10-20 days. This is when the maple farmers tap their maple trees and start to collect their “liquid gold”. It takes between 30-50 gallons of sap to produce one gallon of syrup depending upon the sugar content in the sap. The farmers boil the sap down in their outdoor sugar houses called shacks.

You can stop by one of these sugar shack and experience the process. You will never forget it. A visit is more than buying syrup: There is the smell of wood smoke when approaching the building, the sweet smell of evaporating sap upon entering, and all those sweet maple treats – and maple doughnuts are amazing!

We love Maple Syrup here at the Black Diamond Pub at the Mountain Club on Loon. Many people have opinions on Maple Syrup: Vermont is better, Canadian, New Hampshire Maple syrup, Grade A, AA, B Amber, Robust, etc. We especially love New Hampshire Maple Syrup. We purchase the Finest Grade A Amber Maple Syrup from our good friends at Fuller’s Sugarhouse, as we say here in New Hampshire who happen to be just up the road from us. Its really a win win for us here at the restaurant. We get the best tasting Maple Syrup around and we get to support our local sugarhouse while we do it.

Fuller’s Sugarhouse, located in the small, scenic town of Lancaster in northern New Hampshire among the mighty Presidential Range, is an award-winning producer of pure maple syrup and maple products. Established in 1972, the Fuller family taps more than 10,500 maple trees each spring, Fuller’s produces more than 4,000 gallons of pure maple syrup for the best tasting maple products. The business is owned and operated by Dave and Patti Fuller. Dave first learned how to make maple syrup from his grandfather and loved it so much that he decided to make it a business. Fuller’s Sugarhouse is truly a family affair with the involvement of several generations of the Fuller family, including Dave’s brothers Ed and Russell, and his official taste testers (and grandsons) Isaac and Trever. When you visit their sugarhouse, you will likely be greeted with a smile from one of the Fullers – all happy to give you a tour of their operations and a taste of their pure maple syrup and candy.

If you like maple, you will certainly enjoy the experience of a visit to a sugar shack. Join us in March for Maple Weekend where Sugar houses around the state will open their doors to the public, sharing information on the centuries-old tradition of making maple syrup.